Tuesday, June 27, 2017

New Process for Biodegradable Plastics Production Using Sugar & CO2

Some biodegradable plastics could in the future be made using sugar and carbon dioxide, replacing unsustainable plastics made from crude oil, following research by scientists from the Center for Sustainable Chemical Technologies (CSCT) at the University of Bath.


Safer Form of Polycarbonate Plastic

  • Polycarbonate is used to make drinks bottles, lenses for glasses and in scratch-resistant coatings for phones, CDs and DVDs
  • Current manufacture processes for polycarbonate use BPA (banned from use in baby bottles) and highly toxic phosgene, used as a chemical weapon in World War One
  • Bath scientists have made alternative polycarbonates from sugars and carbon dioxide in a new process that also uses low pressures and room temperature, making it cheaper and safer to produce
  • This new type of polycarbonate can be biodegraded back into carbon dioxide and sugar using enzymes from soil bacteria
  • This new plastic is bio-compatible so could in the future be used for medical implants or as scaffolds for growing replacement organs for transplant.

Polycarbonates from sugars offer a more sustainable alternative to traditional polycarbonate from BPA, however the process uses a highly toxic chemical called phosgene. Now scientists at Bath have developed a much safer, even more sustainable alternative which adds carbon dioxide to the sugar at low pressures and at room temperature.



Biodegradable and Bio-compatible:

The resulting plastic has similar physical properties to those derived from petrochemicals, being strong, transparent and scratch-resistant. The crucial difference is that they can be degraded back into carbon dioxide and sugar using the enzymes found in soil bacteria.
The new BPA-free plastic could potentially replace current polycarbonates in items such as baby bottles and food containers, and since the plastic is bio-compatible, it could also be used for medical implants or as scaffolds for growing tissues or organs for transplant.

Dr Antoine Buchard, Whorrod Research Fellow in the University’s Department of Chemistry, said: “With an ever-growing population, there is an increasing demand for plastics. This new plastic is a renewable alternative to fossil-fuel based polymers, potentially inexpensive, and, because it is biodegradable, will not contribute to growing ocean and landfill waste.

Our process uses carbon dioxide instead of the highly toxic chemical phosgene, and produces a plastic that is free from BPA, so not only is the plastic safer, but the manufacture process is cleaner too.”

 

Using Nature for Inspiration:

Dr Buchard and his team at the Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies, published their work in a series of articles in the journals Polymer Chemistry and Macromolecules.
In particular, they used nature as inspiration for the process, using the sugar found in DNA called thymidine as a building block to make a novel polycarbonate plastic with a lot of potential.

PhD student and first author of the articles, Georgina Gregory, explained: “Thymidine is one of the units that makes up DNA. Because it is already present in the body, it means this plastic will be bio-compatible and can be used safely for tissue engineering applications.

The properties of this new plastic can be fine-tuned by tweaking the chemical structure – for example we can make the plastic positively charged so that cells can stick to it, making it useful as a scaffold for tissue engineering.” Such tissue engineering work has already started in collaboration with Dr Ram Sharma from Chemical Engineering, also part of the CSCT.
  

Using Sugars as Renewable Alternatives to Petrochemicals


The researchers have also looked at using other sugars such as ribose and mannose.
Dr Buchard added: “Chemists have 100 years’ experience with using petrochemicals as a raw material so we need to start again using renewable feedstocks like sugars as a base for synthetic but sustainable materials. It’s early days, but the future looks promising.”

This work was supported by Roger and Sue Whorrod (Fellowship to Dr Buchard), EPSRC (Centre for Doctoral Training in Sustainable Chemical Technologies), University of Bath Alumni Fund and a Royal Society research Grant.

 Source: University of Bath

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Covestro & Partners Develop New Process for Bio-based Aniline Production

Covestro has scored a research breakthrough for the use of plant-based raw materials in plastics production: aniline, an important basic chemical, can now be derived from biomass. The materials manufacturer achieved this by collaborating with partners on the development of a completely new process, initially in the laboratory. Until now, only fossil raw materials had been used for the production of aniline, which plays an important role in the chemical industry and is used as starting material for numerous products. 


Unprecedented Achievement:

Following its success in the lab, Covestro plans to further develop the new process together with partners from industry and research. The first step is to upscale the process in a pilot plant with the ultimate goal of enabling the production of bio-based aniline on an industrial scale. That would be an unprecedented achievement in the chemical industry.

 Aniline as a Precursor for Rigid Polyurethane Foam


About five million metric tons of aniline are produced annually worldwide; the total volume has been increasing by an average of about five percent every year. With a production capacity of about one million metric tons, Covestro is among the leading producers. The company requires aniline as a precursor for rigid polyurethane foam, a highly efficient insulating material used in buildings and refrigeration systems.

The market is showing great interest in ecologically beneficial products based on renewable raw materials,” said Covestro Chief Commercial Officer Dr. Markus Steilemann. “Being able to derive aniline from biomass is another key step towards making the chemical and plastics industries less dependent on fossil raw materials and market fluctuations. With this, we are pursuing our vision of making the world a brighter place.”

The process currently under development uses renewable raw materials and produces aniline with a much better CO2 footprint than that manufactured with standard technology,” said Covestro project manager Dr. Gernot Jäger. “This also enables our customers to markedly improve the CO2 footprint of their aniline-based products.” And the reactions would take place under milder conditions. The ecological aspects of the process are also being thoroughly evaluated by external institutes.





100 Percent of Carbon from Biomass


The industry currently derives aniline from benzene, a petroleum-based raw material. But industrial sugar, which is already derived on large scale from, for example, feed corn, straw and wood, can be used instead. The newly developed process uses a microorganism as a catalyst to first convert the industrial sugar into an aniline precursor. The aniline is then derived by means of chemical catalysis in a second step. “This means one hundred percent of the carbon in the aniline comes from renewable raw materials,” explained Jäger.

Covestro is working with the University of Stuttgart, the CAT Catalytic Center at RWTH Aachen University, and Bayer AG to further develop the process. “This interdisciplinary, motivated team combines all the needed expertise at a very high level and is the basis for continued success,” said Jäger. The long-term research project will receive funding for a period of two and a half years through the FNR (Fachagentur Nachwachsende Rohstoffe e.V.), a project agency of Germany’s Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (funding code: 22010215).

Covestro is already using renewable raw materials in a number of different products. A hardener for coatings that the company developed is one example: up to 70 percent of its carbon content is derived from plants. And CO2 is also increasingly being used an alternative raw material. Used in place of petroleum, CO2 accounts for up to 20 percent of the raw materials used in a precursor for flexible polyurethane foam that Covestro began producing in 2016. The company is also researching and developing many more products based on CO2.


Source: Covestro

Thursday, June 1, 2017

HOW CAN ANTI-BACTERIAL PLASTIC SHEET PREVENT HUMANS FROM MANY DISEASE?

RACPLA Plastic sheet which is incorporated with Silver antimicrobial technology to eliminate micro-organisms. I think it is one time investment for many years and it's cost effective as well for long term basis.



1. Racquet Plastics, Belgium (Plastic sheet makers for all Hospitals)
Website: http://www.racquet-plastics.eu/index.html
ISO 22196 / JIS Z2801 Certified ANTIMICROBIAL PLASTIC SHEET to eliminate MRSA-HOSPITAL BUG ,E-COLI,SALMONELLA and MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCLOSIS,Algae,Fungi and others.

Combination sheets: Special sheets to be made to eliminate tuberculosis bacteria, algae, fungi, and MRSA,Ecoli, salmonella bacteria.And can be used this sheet in Operation Theater,Patient ward,ICU ,Laboratory,and corporate office.
Also this can be used in the following areas:
Wall lining in meat processing unit and poultry farms.




Wall lining animal operating theatre (horse, etc)
Wall line Quarantine tables
Wall lining Brewery
Egg incubator system,
mobile lab, stationary lab.

TB:
Combi sheets which can eliminate Mycobacterium Tuberclosis (TB)bacteria in short period.
Regarding TB there's not much what the supplier have, but if you understand the value of their Institute of Tropical Medicine, you will realize the certificate is powerful.
http://www.itg.be/itg/generalsite/Default.aspx?WPID=689&MIID=674&L=E

Attached the test certificate on Belgium's company plastic sheets for TB.

These sheets can be place on ceilings,walls and flooring for long term performance against TB and other bacteria.

A single sheet size :1000 x 1500 mm

Kindly drop me an email (rosaram211@gmail.com) for better understanding of the product and the installed projects.Now this sheets are available in India.Investors are welcome to reach me to discuss about this business for the Indian/Asian market.