Monday, December 4, 2017

Plastics from Waste Derived BioChemicals & Recycling: 2018 Events

Join us to witness how the field of Polymers & Chemicals is being rejuvenated via Non-Fossil “WASTE” Raw-Materials that are (1) Biobased-Sustainable or (2) Air-Land-Ocean Pollutants”; thereby leading to preservation of petroleum resources, reduction of air-land-ocean pollution, and utilization of free/undesirable raw materials.

June 25-27: BioPlastics: Biobased Re-Invention of Plastics: New York City area

June 28: Plastics Waste: Value-Creation/Healthier Planet: New York City area

Register for the Conference before DECEMBER 31 and get free admission to Bioplastics-2018 course; further details @

http://innoplastsolutions.com/bio.html

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Upcoming Events: 2018

Polyolefins Workshop, Atlanta, GA, March 13-14
Polymers/Bioplastics Failure & Defects, Amsterdam, April 25-26

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Perstorp Introduces Line of Renewable Polyols

Perstorp is announcing world’s first portfolio of renewable alternatives to the essential polyols Pentaerythritol (Penta), Trimethylolpropane (TMP), and Neopentyl glycol (Neo).

Low Carbon Footprint Products

The launch is a response to the fast growing global need for more sustainable Coatings, Resins and Synthetic Lubricants to mention a few. This means that Perstorp is the only chemical company in the world to offer all three essential polyols Penta, TMP and Neo in both traditional and renewable forms.

World’s first renewable Penta, known as Voxtar™, was launched in 2010. It can reduce carbon footprint by up to 80% compared to fossil alternatives. The addition of two new innovative products; Evyron™ (partly renewable TMP) and Neeture™ (partly renewable Neo) will give Perstorp’s customers a clear market advantage in creating pro-environmental low carbon footprint products.

Anna Berggren, Global Market Segment Manager for Resins at Perstorp commented: “The time is right to add two new renewable polyols. The market demand for bio-based material is rapidly increasing due to a strong focus on sustainable chemistry and renewable raw materials. We are committed to our environmental responsibility as well as to helping our customers in their sustainable development. We are dedicated to our pro-environment products, giving prioritized supply for pro-environmental partners at all times.”


Committed to the Pro-environmental Walk


Perstorp’s commitment to sustainability runs deep in the company led by CEO, Jan Secher. “This launch is a great achievement and I’m very proud of the engagement from our employees. It’s clear that we are looking to make a difference. Sustainability is in the core of everything we do which also makes it a perfect strategic fit.”

Perstorp’s new pro-environment portfolio is a great example of how they intend to work towards their 2030 ambition to become Finite Material Neutral. “It is a tough ambition but we have to do it. There is no plan B, because we only have one planet,” Jan continues.

Currently Perstorp is devoting 80% of its R&D resources to finding new sustainable solutions and in addition, all Perstorp Swedish plants will switch to using only renewable electricity in 2018. “With the new pro-environment products we are launching at China Coat, we are reaffirming that we believe our molecules can change things for the better”, Jan concludes.

Good for Business and Good for the Environment:

The two new Pro-Environment Polyols – Evyron™ and Neeture™ - complete the portfolio of the three essential polyols in renewable options. The new portfolio is based on a certified mass balance concept. Mass balance is about mixing fossil and renewable in the same existing systems but keeping track of their quantities and allocating them to specific products. This ensures that the quality and performance of the molecules are exactly the same giving customers a real go-pro-environmental choice.

Perstorp’s Pro-Environment Polyols are all ISCC certified which among other things ensures a traceability of the bio-based raw material back to its country of origin. Anna Berggren highlights: “The bio-based material in our products is sustainably sourced and I am proud to say that Perstorp launches world´s first portfolio of renewable polyols. And even better, they will also be the first to become ISCC certified.”

Voxtar™, Evyron™ & Neeture™ is the property of the Perstorp Group and can be subject to registration in many countries.

Source: Perstorp
 

Thursday, November 23, 2017

Creation of Mussel-based Adhesive from Intestinal Bacteria

UniCat scientists have reprogrammed strains of the intestinal bacteria Escherichia Coli in such a way, that the biological underwater adhesive of mussels can be created with help of the bacteria. The special feature of the new biogenic super glue is that its adhesive properties can be switched on by irradiation with light. This results in long-awaited possibilities for bonding broken bones or teeth that can be fused together again through this bio-adhesive. These findings will be applied in a spin-off.

Biological Adhesive Proteins

  • Regenerative medicine urgently needs powerful adhesives that are biocompatible – well tolerated by the organism in which they are to be used.
  • Such adhesives could treat superficial wounds, and could replace plates and screws which are commonly used to treat bone fractures.
  • Biological adhesive proteins could not only allow the bonding of bone fragments, but also the fusion of the bone itself.
Biotechnological Process:
  • The UniCat members Prof. Dr. Nediljko Budisa from the TU Berlin, Prof. Dr. Holger Dobbek from the HU Berlin and Prof. Dr. Andreas Möglich, now at the University of Bayreuth, have discovered a biotechnological process, through which the biological underwater adhesive of mussels can be produced.
  • Mussels mainly live in the tidal and shelf areas of the oceans. There, they must withstand strong currents and salt water. Mussels use a super adhesive to be able to hold on to the seabed. Even in low tides, when mussel beds are no longer covered by water, the adhesive still has to work.
  • Using this adhesive, the living mussels can adhere to almost any surface. The mussel releases threads from its foot, consisting of a protein glue. The most important component of this protein glue is the amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine, known as "DOPA."

How do scientists produce this super adhesive?

Nediljko Budisa:
"To create these mussel proteins, we use intestinal bacteria, which we reprogrammed. They are like our chemical factory through which we produce the super glue."
For this purpose, a special enzyme, that is obtained from the bacterium Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, was altered by the researchers and introduced into Escherichia coli. Subsequently, the modified intestinal bacteria are fed with the amino acid ONB-DOPA (ortho-nitrobenzyl DOPA). Within the ONB-DOPA molecule, the dihydroxyphenyl groups that are responsible for the strong adhesion, are protected. This is similar to a sticker that has its self-adhesive surface covered by a protective film.
The reprogrammed bacterium now builds these amino acids ‘wrapped in protective film’ into proteins, and a bonding protein is obtained, whose adhesive sites are still protected. It is only after the protected adhesive protein has been separated from the bacteria and purified, that the protective groups are removed by means of light of a specific wavelength (365 nm). Through this, the adhesive protein loses its – figuratively spoken – protective film. Its adhesive points are activated and the protein can be targetedly used as a glue.

From research to market - Spin-off planned

The production or enrichment of Mussel Adhesion Proteins (MAPs) had not yet been satisfactorily resolved: the isolation of these organic glues from mussels and other natural sources is inefficient and expensive. Thus, only 1 to 2 grams of this super adhesive can be obtained from 10,000 mussels. Furthermore, the glue-protein from mussels cannot be obtained homogeneously; that is, each batch is different. An additional disadvantage is that the adhesive protein of the mussel must be used almost immediately due to its good adhesive properties. This new procedure from the UniCat scientists can lead to considerable improvements: an increased yield, the avoidance of animal suffering, and a more homogeneous product with adhesive properties that can be switched on.
Two scientists from Budisa’s working group are planning to establish a spin-off based on this idea that is both environmentally friendly and useful for humanity. "This strategy offers new ways to produce DOPA-based wet adhesives for use in industry and biomedicine with the potential to revolutionize bone surgery and wound healing," assert Christian Schipp and Dr. Matthias Hauf. In order to bring their business idea to life, they plan to use the Inkulab, the spin-off laboratory of the Excellence Cluster UniCat at the TU Berlin, and participate in its incubation program.
Prof. Reinhard Schomäcker, who initiated the start-up Inkulab is delighted: "Precisely for innovative ideas such as this, we founded Inkulab together with the Berlin economy. The science and business hub Berlin is greatly enriched by founding such companies. Germany benefits from this entrepreneurial spirit."

Mussel Proteins:
The strong adhesive properties of these organic glues are due to the presence of 1,2-dihydroxyphenyl groups in the side chain of the amino acid L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA). L-DOPA is a non-proteinogenic amino acid. Thus, it is not one of the 21 amino acids used as building blocks for the formation of proteins in living cells. L-Dopa is produced by hydroxylation of the proteinogenic amino acid tyrosine (post-translational production) and is particularly well suited for surface adhesion.
The research work on photoactivatable mussel-based underwater detachment proteins is a collaborative effort between three UniCat working groups, and has been published in the journal ChemBioChem.

Source: UniCat

Monday, October 9, 2017

POLYOLEFINS: Advances in Technology/Product Developments, DEC 15, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA; Discount Ends NOV 17

Although radical innovations are getting harder in a maturing chemicals / plastics industry, there is always a continuous need for incremental improvements. Demands from the marketplace and customers dictate that the New/Improved products be developed to deliver high-performance and in-time. Although polyolefins date as back as 1930’s, new products & processes have continued to emerge. This crash-course is designed to deliver the following:
·        An executive overview of the Polyolefins field
·        How to avoid the pitfalls in developing successful products @ High-Speed
·        Emerging Additives that enable the products customers are looking for
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Click the link below for TESTIMONIALS and BROCHURE:
http://innoplastsolutions.com/courses/polyolefins-latest-products-technology.html
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Upcoming Events: 2018

  1. Polymer/BioPlastic Failure & Defects: $MM Problem Solving Case-Histories, Amsterdam, April 25-26, 2018
  2.  Plastics Tomorrow via Biobased Chemicals & Recycling, New York City area, JUNE 25-28, 2018

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

3D Printed Models Used to Train Surgeons & Reduce Surgery Time

A team of engineers and pediatric orthopedic surgeons are using 3D printing to help train surgeons and shorten surgeries for the most common hip disorder found in children ages 9 to 16.


Shortening Surgery Times

In a recent study, researchers showed that allowing surgeons to prep on a 3D printed model of the patient’s hip joint cut by about 25 percent the amount of time needed for surgery when compared to a control group.
The team, which includes bioengineers from the University of California San Diego and physicians from Rady Children’s Hospital, detailed their findings in a recent issue of the Journal of Children’s Orthopedics.

Dr. Vidyadhar Upasani, pediatric orthopedic surgeon at Rady Children’s and UC San Diego and the paper’s senior author, said:
“Being able to practice on these 3D models is crucial.”

In this study, Upasani operated on a total of 10 patients. For five of the patients, he planned the surgeries using 3D printed models. He didn’t use models to plan the other five. In addition, two other surgeons operated on a different group of five patients without using models. In the group where Upasani used 3D printed models, surgeries were 38-45 minutes shorter compared with the two control groups. These time savings would translate into at least $2700 in savings per surgery, researchers said. By contrast, after the one-time cost of buying a 3D printer for about $2200, physicians can make a model for each surgery for about $10.

The results of the study were so positive that Rady Children’s orthopedics department has acquired its own 3D printer, Upasani said. “I’ve seen how beneficial 3D models are,” he said. “It’s now hard to plan surgeries without them.”

Slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a condition that affects about 11 in 100,000 children in the United States every year.

In this condition, the head of the patient’s femur slips along the bone’s growth plate, deforming it. The main goal of the surgery is to sculpt the femur back into its normal shape and restore hip function. This is difficult because during the surgery, the bone and its growth plate are not directly visible. So the surgeons can’t visualize in 3D how the growth plate is deformed. The condition is associated with obesity and hormonal dysfunction and has become more common as obesity increases among young people.

Traditionally, before the surgery, physicians study X-rays of the surgery site taken from different angles, which they use to plan the bone cuts. During surgery, an X-ray fluoroscopy beam also shines periodically on the surgery site to help guide the physician. These methods are time consuming and expose the child to radiation. In addition, physicians don’t have a physical model to educate patients or practice the surgery beforehand.


How the 3D Printed Models Were Made


In this study, two UC San Diego students, Jason Caffrey, pursuing a Ph.D. in bioengineering, and Lillia Cherkasskiy, pursuing an M.D. and conducting her Independent Studies Project, teamed up with Upasani, bioengineering professor Robert Sah, and their colleagues. They used commercially available software to process CT scans of the patients’ pelvis and create a computerized model of bone and growth plate for 3D printing. The models allowed surgeons to practice and visualize the surgery before they operated in the real world.

One of the biggest obstacles was getting the right texture for the 3D prints, so that they mimic bone. If the texture was too thick, the model would melt under the surgeon’s tools; if too thin, it would break. The engineers finally settled on a honeycomb-like structure to mimic bones for their models. The printing process itself took four to 10 hours for each print.

The 3D printing effort was led by Caffrey, in the lab of professor Sah at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego. The inspiration and foundations for the study came from BENG 1, a hands-on engineering class that Sah, among the world leaders in tissue engineering and cartilage repair, co-taught in 2015 and Caffrey helped set up. Students’ 3D printed models of complex ankle bone fractures from CT scans of UC San Diego patients. BENG 1 continues to be a part of the “Experience Engineering” initiative introduced by Albert P. Pisano, dean of the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego.

Caffrey is now working on his medical degree at the UC San Diego School of Medicine. He is still collaborating with Upasani at Rady Children’s to use 3D printed models to evaluate the best way to surgically correct hip dysplasia, a developmental deformation or misalignment of the hip joint found in infants.


Source: University of California San Diego

Sunday, October 1, 2017

Polyolefins: Latest on Technology/Product Developments, DEC 15, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA


 Although radical innovations are getting harder in a maturing chemicals / plastics industry, there is always a continuous need for incremental improvements. Demands from the marketplace and customers dictate that the New/Improved products be developed to deliver high-performance and in-time. Although polyolefins date as back as 1930’s, new products & processes have continued to emerge. This crash-course is designed to deliver the following:

· An executive overview of the Polyolefins field

· How to avoid the pitfalls in developing successful products @ High-Speed

· Emerging Additives that enable the products customers are looking for

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Click the link below for TESTIMONIALS and BROCHURE: http://innoplastsolutions.com/courses/polyolefins-latest-products-technology.html

Upcoming Events: 2018

Polymer/BioPlastic Failure & Defects: $MM Problem Solving Case-Histories, Amsterdam, April 25-26, 2018

Plastics Tomorrow via Biobased Chemicals & Recycling, New York City area, JUNE 25-28, 2018

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Free Webinar:Take your studies to the next step with a Ecology and Population Genetics Master´s in Finland

This programme will provide you with wide knowledge in ecology and population genetics of plant, animal and fungal species, with emphasis on endangered species and ecosystems. Register https://goo.gl/dJGNQ6

Duration: 1 hour
The University of Oulu in Northern Finland is an international, multidisciplinary research university with a rich pool of creative and intellectual talent. More specifically, the University of Oulu encompasses a science university, a technical university and a business school in the same organization.

The Oulu Region is recognized as a world-class R&D hub with R&D input per capita among the highest globally. Already some 2.3 billion people use ICT solutions designed in Oulu on a daily basis.
In this webinar you’ll learn more about natural science studies and biodiversity and conservation biology in particular. Ecology and Population Genetics programme prepares students for future leadership positions in conservation biology and environmental ecology. The programme provides the students with wide knowledge in ecology and population genetics of plant, animal and fungal species, with emphasis on endangered species and ecosystems.
Join this webinar to learn more from our dedicated staff and students!

Register https://goo.gl/dJGNQ6

Monday, September 11, 2017

Evonik to Acquire J M. Huber’s Silica Business

Evonik will complete the acquisition of US company J.M. Huber Corporation’s silica business for US$ 630 million, as planned, in the second half of the year. The transaction closed on September 1, 2017 after approval by the relevant authorities. Contributions from the new business will therefore be included in Evonik’s sales and earnings as of this date.

Expand Position in the Silica Business

Christian Kullmann, Chairman of the Executive Board of Evonik, said: “With the successful closing of the acquisition, we are strengthening our ‘Smart Materials’ growth engine by continuing to expand our globally leading position in the silica business.”
The newly acquired business will be integrated into the Resource Efficiency Segment. The intensive planning work that has been done for the integration over the past few months will be put into action straight away.

The acquisition is a perfect match for Evonik’s product portfolio. Huber Silica is especially oriented towards applications in the consumer goods industry, the dental sector for example. To date, Evonik’s silica business has been more focused on industrial applications, for example in the tire and coatings industries.


Source: Evonik 

Daikin Agrees to Acquire Heroflon for Fluoropolymers Business Expansion

Daikin has recently agreed to acquire Heroflon S.p.A., an Italian manufacturer of fluoropolymer compounds. Daikin will obtain all company shares owned by the Heroflon Executive Officers with finalization of the acquisition planned for the end of October 2017 after completion of all necessary procedures.

Heroflon is a compound manufacturer that produces high-performance fluoropolymers by combining various materials. Its product lineup includes fluoropolymer compounds and micro-powders centering on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE).

PTFE is a highly functional and high value-added fluoropolymer used in a wide range of fields including:

  • Automotive
  • Construction
  • Electrical power
  • Chemical industries

Accelerating Product Development


Daikin supplies various kinds of fluoropolymers such as PTFE to processing companies including compounders. With this acquisition, Daikin fully enters the compound business for fluoropolymers and will utilize its global network to expand sales of Heroflon's fluoropolymer compounds and micro-powders.

The company also expects this acquisition to further strengthen its relationship with European car manufacturers together with sales expansion of fluoroelastomers and Automotive air conditioning refrigerant. By accelerating product development that meets customer needs, Daikin expects to realize sales expansion of fluorinated materials for automobiles.

Increase Global Sales of Fluoropolymers


Moreover, with the automotive parts market shifting toward fluoropolymers to reduce weight, promote miniaturization, and lower fuel consumption, Daikin aims to increase global sales of fluoropolymers and fluoroelastomers to 100 billion yen in 2020 by developing products corresponding to a greater need for functional enhancement, such as in heat and wear resistance, and providing technical services.

Source: Daikin

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

New Process for Biodegradable Plastics Production Using Sugar & CO2

Some biodegradable plastics could in the future be made using sugar and carbon dioxide, replacing unsustainable plastics made from crude oil, following research by scientists from the Center for Sustainable Chemical Technologies (CSCT) at the University of Bath.


Safer Form of Polycarbonate Plastic

  • Polycarbonate is used to make drinks bottles, lenses for glasses and in scratch-resistant coatings for phones, CDs and DVDs
  • Current manufacture processes for polycarbonate use BPA (banned from use in baby bottles) and highly toxic phosgene, used as a chemical weapon in World War One
  • Bath scientists have made alternative polycarbonates from sugars and carbon dioxide in a new process that also uses low pressures and room temperature, making it cheaper and safer to produce
  • This new type of polycarbonate can be biodegraded back into carbon dioxide and sugar using enzymes from soil bacteria
  • This new plastic is bio-compatible so could in the future be used for medical implants or as scaffolds for growing replacement organs for transplant.

Polycarbonates from sugars offer a more sustainable alternative to traditional polycarbonate from BPA, however the process uses a highly toxic chemical called phosgene. Now scientists at Bath have developed a much safer, even more sustainable alternative which adds carbon dioxide to the sugar at low pressures and at room temperature.



Biodegradable and Bio-compatible:

The resulting plastic has similar physical properties to those derived from petrochemicals, being strong, transparent and scratch-resistant. The crucial difference is that they can be degraded back into carbon dioxide and sugar using the enzymes found in soil bacteria.
The new BPA-free plastic could potentially replace current polycarbonates in items such as baby bottles and food containers, and since the plastic is bio-compatible, it could also be used for medical implants or as scaffolds for growing tissues or organs for transplant.

Dr Antoine Buchard, Whorrod Research Fellow in the University’s Department of Chemistry, said: “With an ever-growing population, there is an increasing demand for plastics. This new plastic is a renewable alternative to fossil-fuel based polymers, potentially inexpensive, and, because it is biodegradable, will not contribute to growing ocean and landfill waste.

Our process uses carbon dioxide instead of the highly toxic chemical phosgene, and produces a plastic that is free from BPA, so not only is the plastic safer, but the manufacture process is cleaner too.”

 

Using Nature for Inspiration:

Dr Buchard and his team at the Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies, published their work in a series of articles in the journals Polymer Chemistry and Macromolecules.
In particular, they used nature as inspiration for the process, using the sugar found in DNA called thymidine as a building block to make a novel polycarbonate plastic with a lot of potential.

PhD student and first author of the articles, Georgina Gregory, explained: “Thymidine is one of the units that makes up DNA. Because it is already present in the body, it means this plastic will be bio-compatible and can be used safely for tissue engineering applications.

The properties of this new plastic can be fine-tuned by tweaking the chemical structure – for example we can make the plastic positively charged so that cells can stick to it, making it useful as a scaffold for tissue engineering.” Such tissue engineering work has already started in collaboration with Dr Ram Sharma from Chemical Engineering, also part of the CSCT.
  

Using Sugars as Renewable Alternatives to Petrochemicals


The researchers have also looked at using other sugars such as ribose and mannose.
Dr Buchard added: “Chemists have 100 years’ experience with using petrochemicals as a raw material so we need to start again using renewable feedstocks like sugars as a base for synthetic but sustainable materials. It’s early days, but the future looks promising.”

This work was supported by Roger and Sue Whorrod (Fellowship to Dr Buchard), EPSRC (Centre for Doctoral Training in Sustainable Chemical Technologies), University of Bath Alumni Fund and a Royal Society research Grant.

 Source: University of Bath

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Covestro & Partners Develop New Process for Bio-based Aniline Production

Covestro has scored a research breakthrough for the use of plant-based raw materials in plastics production: aniline, an important basic chemical, can now be derived from biomass. The materials manufacturer achieved this by collaborating with partners on the development of a completely new process, initially in the laboratory. Until now, only fossil raw materials had been used for the production of aniline, which plays an important role in the chemical industry and is used as starting material for numerous products. 


Unprecedented Achievement:

Following its success in the lab, Covestro plans to further develop the new process together with partners from industry and research. The first step is to upscale the process in a pilot plant with the ultimate goal of enabling the production of bio-based aniline on an industrial scale. That would be an unprecedented achievement in the chemical industry.

 Aniline as a Precursor for Rigid Polyurethane Foam


About five million metric tons of aniline are produced annually worldwide; the total volume has been increasing by an average of about five percent every year. With a production capacity of about one million metric tons, Covestro is among the leading producers. The company requires aniline as a precursor for rigid polyurethane foam, a highly efficient insulating material used in buildings and refrigeration systems.

The market is showing great interest in ecologically beneficial products based on renewable raw materials,” said Covestro Chief Commercial Officer Dr. Markus Steilemann. “Being able to derive aniline from biomass is another key step towards making the chemical and plastics industries less dependent on fossil raw materials and market fluctuations. With this, we are pursuing our vision of making the world a brighter place.”

The process currently under development uses renewable raw materials and produces aniline with a much better CO2 footprint than that manufactured with standard technology,” said Covestro project manager Dr. Gernot Jäger. “This also enables our customers to markedly improve the CO2 footprint of their aniline-based products.” And the reactions would take place under milder conditions. The ecological aspects of the process are also being thoroughly evaluated by external institutes.





100 Percent of Carbon from Biomass


The industry currently derives aniline from benzene, a petroleum-based raw material. But industrial sugar, which is already derived on large scale from, for example, feed corn, straw and wood, can be used instead. The newly developed process uses a microorganism as a catalyst to first convert the industrial sugar into an aniline precursor. The aniline is then derived by means of chemical catalysis in a second step. “This means one hundred percent of the carbon in the aniline comes from renewable raw materials,” explained Jäger.

Covestro is working with the University of Stuttgart, the CAT Catalytic Center at RWTH Aachen University, and Bayer AG to further develop the process. “This interdisciplinary, motivated team combines all the needed expertise at a very high level and is the basis for continued success,” said Jäger. The long-term research project will receive funding for a period of two and a half years through the FNR (Fachagentur Nachwachsende Rohstoffe e.V.), a project agency of Germany’s Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (funding code: 22010215).

Covestro is already using renewable raw materials in a number of different products. A hardener for coatings that the company developed is one example: up to 70 percent of its carbon content is derived from plants. And CO2 is also increasingly being used an alternative raw material. Used in place of petroleum, CO2 accounts for up to 20 percent of the raw materials used in a precursor for flexible polyurethane foam that Covestro began producing in 2016. The company is also researching and developing many more products based on CO2.


Source: Covestro

Thursday, June 1, 2017

HOW CAN ANTI-BACTERIAL PLASTIC SHEET PREVENT HUMANS FROM MANY DISEASE?

RACPLA Plastic sheet which is incorporated with Silver antimicrobial technology to eliminate micro-organisms. I think it is one time investment for many years and it's cost effective as well for long term basis.



1. Racquet Plastics, Belgium (Plastic sheet makers for all Hospitals)
Website: http://www.racquet-plastics.eu/index.html
ISO 22196 / JIS Z2801 Certified ANTIMICROBIAL PLASTIC SHEET to eliminate MRSA-HOSPITAL BUG ,E-COLI,SALMONELLA and MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCLOSIS,Algae,Fungi and others.

Combination sheets: Special sheets to be made to eliminate tuberculosis bacteria, algae, fungi, and MRSA,Ecoli, salmonella bacteria.And can be used this sheet in Operation Theater,Patient ward,ICU ,Laboratory,and corporate office.
Also this can be used in the following areas:
Wall lining in meat processing unit and poultry farms.




Wall lining animal operating theatre (horse, etc)
Wall line Quarantine tables
Wall lining Brewery
Egg incubator system,
mobile lab, stationary lab.

TB:
Combi sheets which can eliminate Mycobacterium Tuberclosis (TB)bacteria in short period.
Regarding TB there's not much what the supplier have, but if you understand the value of their Institute of Tropical Medicine, you will realize the certificate is powerful.
http://www.itg.be/itg/generalsite/Default.aspx?WPID=689&MIID=674&L=E

Attached the test certificate on Belgium's company plastic sheets for TB.

These sheets can be place on ceilings,walls and flooring for long term performance against TB and other bacteria.

A single sheet size :1000 x 1500 mm

Kindly drop me an email (rosaram211@gmail.com) for better understanding of the product and the installed projects.Now this sheets are available in India.Investors are welcome to reach me to discuss about this business for the Indian/Asian market.


Saturday, May 13, 2017

Plastics Re-Revolution since 1930's; WASTE(s) are New Crude Oil, MAY 23-25, NEW YORK area

There are 2-Compelling Reasons Why You Must Attend This Bio-Conference:

1. Traditional & New Polymers: Biobased building blocks are enabling the manufacture of traditional polymers (Polyolefins/Polyesters/Nylons) as well as newer polymers such as PEF (vs PET for packaging) and Nylon 410 to name a few.

2. Environment Re-Engineering: Bill Gates funds $14M for Plantro-Chemicals and heads-up a $1 Billion fund to fight climate change.

LAND Pollution: Building blocks for polymers are being made via forest and municipal WASTES as opposed to petro-based chemicals

CLIMATE Pollution: In further support to worldwide Paris-2015 agreement on climate control, Bill Gates will be heading a $1 Billion fund to fight climate change. Use of biobased-renewable raw materials to make polymers, especially the greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4), is a step towards that goal.

WATER Pollution: About 50Blbs / year of plastic leaks into ocean with potentially adverse effects on humans via seafood. Commercialization of PHA can address that issue as it biodegrades in river and ocean waters
……………………………………………………………………………………
Please register via the link below:
http://innoplastsolutions.com/bio/registration/join/12-biobased-re-invention-of-plastics

Master's in Chemistry in Germany with no tuition fees! [31st May LIVE WEBINAR]

Do you want to study your MSc in Environmental Chemistry with no tuition fees? Now it is possible at Bayreuth University in Germany - the University that provides students with cross-disciplinary skills enabling them to advance innovative developments in the field of Chemistry! https://goo.gl/7eSE9V
 
Join this Online Open Day to learn about content of the Master's program, career perspectives after graduation and admission requirements for your no-cost Master's degree at a prestigious German University!

Curious about it? Register here: https://goo.gl/7eSE9V!

Monday, May 8, 2017

New Promising Way to Recycle Carbon Fiber-reinforced Plastics: WSU

A research team from WSU for the first time has developed a promising way to recycle the popular carbon fiber plastics that are used in everything from modern airplanes and sporting goods to the wind energy industry.

The work, reported in Polymer Degradation and Stability, provides an efficient way to re-use the expensive carbon fiber and other materials that make up the composites.

Planes, Windmills, Many Products


Jinwen Zhang with his Carbon Fiber Recycling Research Team
Carbon fiber reinforced plastics are increasingly popular in many industries, particularly aviation, because they are light and strong. They are, however:
  • Very difficult to break down or recycle, and disposing of them has become of increasing concern. 
  • Thermoplastics - type of plastic used in milk bottles, can be melted and easily re-used whereas, composites used in planes are thermoset plastics which are cured and can’t easily be undone and returned to their original materials.

Caustic Chemicals Eliminated


  • To recycle them, researchers mostly have tried grinding them down mechanically or breaking them down with very high temperatures or harsh chemicals to recover the expensive carbon fiber. Oftentimes, however, the carbon fiber is damaged in the process. 
  • The caustic chemicals used are hazardous and difficult to dispose of. 
  • They also destroy the matrix resin materials in the composites, creating a messy mixture of chemicals and an additional waste problem.

Mild Chemicals, Low Temperatures


In their project, Jinwen Zhang, a professor in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, and his team developed a new chemical recycling method that used mild acids as catalysts in liquid ethanol at a relatively low temperature to break down the thermosets. In particular, it was the combination of chemicals that proved effective, said Zhang, who has a chemistry background. To break down cured materials effectively, the researchers raised the temperature of the material so that the catalyst-containing liquid can penetrate into the composite and break down the complex structure. Zhang used ethanol to make the resins expand and zinc chloride to break down critical carbon-nitrogen bonds.

Jinwen Zhang said:
“It is critical to develop efficient catalytic systems that are capable of permeating into the cured resins and breaking down the chemical bonds of cured resins.”

The researchers were able to preserve the carbon fibers as well as the resin material in a useful form that could be easily re-used. They have filed for a patent and are working to commercialize their methods.

The work was funded by the Joint Center for Aerospace Technology Innovation (JCATI) in collaboration with industry partner, Global Fiberglass Solutions. The state-funded JCATI works to support the Washington’s aerospace industry by pursuing research that is relevant to aerospace companies and by providing industry-focused research opportunities. In addition to Zhang, researchers on the project included Junna Xin, assistant research professor, Tuan Liu, postdoctoral research associate, and graduate student Xiaolong Guo. The research is in keeping with WSU’s Grand Challenges initiative stimulating research to address some of society’s most complex issues. It is particularly relevant to the challenge of “Smart Systems” and its theme of foundational and emergent materials.


Source: Washington State University (WSU)

Sunday, April 16, 2017

Plastics Re-Revolution since 1930's; WASTE(s) are New Crude Oil, MAY 23-25, NEW YORK area

There are 2-Compelling Reasons Why You Must Attend This Bio-Conference:

1. Traditional & New Polymers: Biobased building blocks are enabling the manufacture of traditional polymers (Polyolefins/Polyesters/Nylons) as well as newer polymers such as PEF (vs PET for packaging) and Nylon 410 to name a few.
2. Environment Re-Engineering: Bill Gates funds $14M for Plantro-Chemicals and heads-up a $1 Billion fund to fight climate change.

LAND Pollution: Building blocks for polymers are being made via forest and municipal WASTES as opposed to petro-based chemicals
CLIMATE Pollution: In further support to worldwide Paris-2015 agreement on climate control, Bill Gates will be heading a $1 Billion fund to fight climate change. Use of biobased-renewable raw materials to make polymers, especially the greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4), is a step towards that goal.
WATER Pollution: About 50Blbs / year of plastic leaks into ocean with potentially adverse effects on humans via seafood. Commercialization of PHA can address that issue as it biodegrades in river and ocean waters
……………………………………………………………………………………
Please register via the link below:
http://innoplastsolutions.com/bio/registration/join/12-biobased-re-invention-of-plastics

Friday, March 24, 2017

FREE WEBINAR ON UNDER GRADUATE Study in Beautiful Izmir, Turkey!

Yaşar University is a state of the art private university located in Izmir, Turkey. The University offers over 50 degree programmes 100% in English. The University carries the ECTS label, Diploma Supplement label, Erasmus charter and is fully accredited, and a member of the European Universities Association! https://goo.gl/Swtiwy

İzmir is a major centre for technology and business in the region of the Mediterranean, Caucasus, Balkans, Central Asia and the Middle East. 

Experience the vibrancy of East meeting the West as Europe meets Asia. Contemporary meets traditional, and all intertwined with the city's 8,500 years of history. It is located next to the coast and 30 mins away from all the most beautiful beaches in the world. The rich culture and modern ethnic roots will give you a different vision and experience! 
Yasar University offers udergraduate course in Business, Engineering, IT & Computer Science, Health & Life Sciences, Law, Media & Communications, Economics

Register here: https://goo.gl/Swtiwy!

Saturday, March 11, 2017

FREE WEBINAR REGISTRATION for MASTERS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING IN QATAR

Title: Connect to your Chemical Engineering Future today!

Is chemical engineering your passion, your career and your future? Or you are specialising in another engineering area and you are ready to take the next step? 

Texas A&M University in Qatar presents a uniquely designed webinar about its two Master´s programs in Chemical Engineering and you are invited! https://goo.gl/bSBPkc

Join the online session on March 16 to find out everything you need about the programs´s structure, the scholarship opportunities and the available assistantships from Dr. Ahmed Abdel - Wahab, the chairman of the Graduate Committee and its team.

So, on one hand, the US higher education system: Cutting edge technology, groundbreaking research, pragmatic teaching methods and a unique campus life experience. On the other hand Qatar: The lowest unemployment rates, the wealthiest local residents, the biggest large-scale infrastructure projects and the 2020 FIFA World Cup. 

Do you want to become part of this highly respected combination? Then save your place for the webinar today!: https://goo.gl/bSBPkc!

Monday, March 6, 2017

Biobased Re-Revolution of Plastics/Chemicals; New York, May 23-25

Why Revolution: It’s Raw-Materials; WASTE(s) that are Bio-Based/Sustainable or Climate Harming GASES; not PetroBased
………………………………………………………………………………………..
2-Compelling Reasons Why You Must Attend
1. Traditional & New Polymers: Biobased building blocks are enabling the manufacture of traditional polymers (Polyolefins/Polyesters/Nylons) as well as newer polymers such as PEF (vs PET for packaging) and Nylon 410 to name a few.
2. Environment Re-Engineering: Bill Gates funds $14M for Plantro-Chemicals and heads-up a $1 Billion fund to fight climate change.
 a. LAND Pollution: Building blocks for polymers are being made via forest and municipal WASTES as opposed to petro-based chemicals
b. CLIMATE Pollution: In further support to worldwide Paris-2015 agreement on climate control, Bill Gates will be heading a $1 Billion fund to fight climate change. Use of biobased-renewable raw materials to make polymers, especially the greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4), is a step towards that goal.
c. WATER Pollution: About 50Blbs / year of plastic leaks into ocean with potentially adverse effects on humans via seafood. Commercialization of PHA can address that issue as it biodegrades in river and ocean waters
………………………………………………………………………………………..
Registration & Details via the link, http://innoplastsolutions.com/bio.html

Sunday, March 5, 2017

Hair's Strength Inspires New Polymer for Body Armor

Researchers have studied why human hair is so strong to inform the design of new synthetic materials, including polymers for body armor.
Observations researchers have made about why human hair is so strong and resistant to breaking could form the basis for the development of new synthetic materials , including polymers that could be well-suited for body armor.
Human hair has a strength-to-weight ratio comparable to steel and can be stretched up to one and a half times its original length before breaking. Understanding why this is so was the aim of a cross-disciplinary team of mechanical engineers and nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego.
Researchers observed at the nanoscale level how a strand of human hair behaves when it is deformed, or stretched. What they found was that hair behaves differently depending on how fast or slow it is stretched; the faster hair is stretched, the stronger it is, they said.
Marc Meyers, a professor of mechanical engineering at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, said one of the interests the team had in studying the strength of human hair dates back to Roman times, when horse and human hair was used to propel powerful war machines called the ballistae, he said. Ballistae were ancient missile weapons that could hurl projectiles at a distant target.
“We discovered that the keratin in hair, because of an alpha-to-beta transformation occurring on stretching, can store a large amount of energy,” he told Design News in an interview. “We therefore confirm the soundness of the use of hair for the ballistae.”

The reason hair can be stretched so far and even gain strength lies in how its structure changes, according to the researchers. Hair consists of two main parts--the cortex, which is made up of parallel fibrils, and the matrix, which has an amorphous structure. The matrix is sensitive to the speed at which hair is deformed, while the cortex is not.

The combination of these two components gives hair the ability to withstand high stress and strain, Meyers said, a phenomenon that researchers observed at the nanoscale.
At this level, it could be observed how the cortex fibrils in hair are each comprised of thousands of coiled spiral-shaped chains of molecules called alpha helix chains. As hair is deformed, the alpha helix chains uncoil and become pleated sheet structures called beta sheets. It’s this structural change that allows hair to handle a large amount deformation without breaking, according to researchers.
hair
“Nature creates a variety of interesting materials and architectures in very ingenious ways,” Meyers said of the findings. “We’re interested in understanding the correlation between the structure and the properties of biological materials to develop synthetic materials and designs--based on nature--that have better performance than existing ones.”
Another interesting observation researchers made is that the structural transformation hair undergoes when stretched is partially reversible, they said. When hair is stretched under a small amount of strain, it can recover its original shape, but if stretched


Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Connect to your Chemical Engineering Future today!


Is chemical engineering your passion, your career and your future? Or you are specialising in another engineering area and you are ready to take the next step? 
Texas A&M University in Qatar presents a uniquely designed webinar about its two Master´s programs in Chemical Engineering and you are invited! https://goo.gl/bSBPkc
Join the online session on March 16 to find out everything you need about the programs´s structure, the scholarship opportunities and the available assistantships from Dr. Ahmed Abdel - Wahab, the chairman of the Graduate Committee and its team.
So, on one hand, the US higher education system: Cutting edge technology, groundbreaking research, pragmatic teaching methods and a unique campus life experience. On the other hand Qatar: The lowest unemployment rates, the wealthiest local residents, the biggest large-scale infrastructure projects and the 2020 FIFA World Cup. 
Do you want to become part of this highly respected combination? Then save your place for the webinar today!: https://goo.gl/bSBPkc!

Friday, February 24, 2017

Repsol Opens Pilot Plant for Sustainable PC Polyol Production


Repsol has developed a new type of polyol, polycarbonate polyol, which will partially replace its raw material, propylene oxide with the abundant and sustainable alternative, CO2. 

Polyol with a 20% of CO2:
This will result in reduction in the emission of pollutants into the atmosphere and, consequently, lessening environmental footprint impact.
Repsol has worked together with selected customers who have manufactured products with this innovative polyol. Additional advantages of this new polycarbonate polyol are that, it enhances certain properties of different CASE applications.

Improved Adherence and Elasticity:
For adhesives and elastomers, the improved features can be: added adherence and elasticity compared with conventional polyols. They also have specific properties that mean they can be applied in other ways in the future.

Repsol has already started production of its polycarbonate polyol in the pilot plant located in Puertollano, Spain. With this plant Repsol aims to produce polyol with a 20% of CO2. This is a step forward for a more ambitious project at industrial scale.

With this product, Repsol reinforces its commitment to innovation, sustainability and contributing to a better environment. Repsol offers a portfolio of polyols with a wide range of alternatives to meet the specific needs of its customers.

Source: Repsol 

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

BASF Introduces Polyether Polyol for Automotive Applications

The interior air quality of cars can now be improved with BASF's new polyether polyol . The new grade is part of the Lupranol® brand which is used in the production of automotive applications made of highly resilient flexible and semi-rigid polyurethane foams. The low VOC grade polyol has been proven to significantly reduce VOC emissions, particularly aldehyde, making it a sustainable alternative in the production of polyurethane foams for automotive interior applications such as seats, headliners, and steering wheels.

Lupranol® - Low VOC Grade Polyol:
“Automotive OEMs in Asia, especially in China and Korea, are seeking solutions to enhance vehicle interior air quality, and this new grade will help them meet the increasingly stringent regulatory standards for VOC emissions,” “VOCs can be effectively reduced with changes to manufacturing processes. As such, we play a key role in contributing towards environmental sustainability and health.

Reduction in Aldehyde Emissions by 5-10%:

Lupranol’s low VOC grade is the result of improvements made in the manufacturing process of the material. It has one of the lowest levels of aldehyde emissions – specifically formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein – in polyurethane solutions available in the market for automotive applications. In the tests conducted by Center Testing International Group Co Ltd, a leading testing agency in China, the new Lupranol demonstrated a reduction in aldehyde emissions by 5-10% for formaldehyde, 30-40% for acetaldehyde and 30-40% for acrolein.

Lupranol is well-suited for automotive applications as it produces highly resilient polyurethane foams, for example Elastoflex®, with good physical properties. Compared to conventional foams, Elastoflex provides higher comfort, improved elasticity and better load bearing properties.

Source: BASF

Sunday, February 12, 2017

Toray & Mitsui Sugar Form JV for Biochemicals Production from Bagasse

Toray Industries has announced that it has decided to establish a joint venture company with Mitsui Sugar for seeking business opportunities for manufacturing system of cellulosic sugar, a raw material used for producing various biochemical products, from the surplus bagasse generated at sugar mills.


Chemical Products Made from Inedible Biomass:

The technological demonstration is part of the research and technological development of bioprocess using membranes that combines Toray's water treatment membrane and bio technologies. Bioprocess using membranes is a technology that would enable the production of a high quality, low cost cellulosic sugar from inedible biomass while saving 50% energy in manufacturing by using water treatment membranes in the saccharificationand refining processes, and contributes to the realization of materials and chemical products made from inedible biomass.







Energy-Saving Cellulosic Sugar Production System:

Further, Toray and Mitsui Sugar will carry out the Demonstration Project for an Energy-Saving Cellulosic Sugar Production System using Bagasse in the Kingdom of Thailand under the International Energy Conservation Technology and System Demonstration Project of New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) and the project is aimed at examining the possibilities of commercialization of the cellulosic sugar production system. Thailand is one of the foremost producers of sugarcane in the world and is the largest exporter of sugar in Asia. It has been promoting biomass-based businesses as well as research and technology development and is suitable for pursuing the demonstration project. 



High Quality Cellulosic Sugar:

The demonstration plant of this project will have a capacity to handle 15 tons of bagasse per day (dry weight) and will manufacture about 4.2 tons of cellulosic sugar after going through the processes of pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, and membrane separation. The pilot plant will employ concentration technology that uses Toray's water treatment membranes to produce high quality cellulosic sugar while conserving energy. Cellulosic sugar can be used as a raw material for producing various biochemical products such as ethanol, lactic acid and succinic acid, and this would enable the creation of a new supply chain from surplus bagasse to biochemical products

Further, in addition to cellulosic sugar, the plant will manufacture polyphenol and oligosaccharide, which can be made into livestock feed, using the same raw material and process to raise the economic benefit of using bagasse and the company will pursue commercialization through the demonstration project. 

Toray places environment as the linchpin of its business strategy so as to contribute to the realization of a sustainable low-carbon society, and under this management policy, the company has established itself as a pioneering comprehensive chemical manufacturer in Japan to promote LCM environment management based on the LCA concept. As part of its endeavor, Toray will actively pursue open innovation between different industries related to bioconversion technology using membranes and drive forward the development of supply chain and provisioning of solutions.



Source: Toray

Friday, February 10, 2017

*Plastics Modification: Conference & Toll-Compounding Center*

Delight your customers by “Improving Plastic Formulations”. Join us andnetwork with the entire value-chain from suppliers to BRAND-OWNERS such asJohnson & Johnson at our upcoming conference “*Plastics Modification:Industrial-to-Medical Products*”, Atlanta, GA, March 7-9, 2017

Below are the 5-Sessions at this conference:

*1.* *Advances in SURFACE Optics *&* Aesthetics*

*2.* *Latest on LIGHT-WEIGHTING Technologies*

*3.* *Evolving Trends *&* Update on FLAMMABILITY*

*4.* *Modification of MEDICAL Plastics*

*5.* *Improving STRUCTURAL *&* BUILDING Products*


For Conference details, please CLICK on the link below;
*https://innoplastsolutions.com/plastics-modification